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Transport Fever 2 - Railway Vehicle List (America)

Written by wide range asbestos   /   Dec 23, 2019    


More Transport Fever 2 Guides:


A complete list of all purchasable railway and railroad vehicles in the game with their stats, ordered by appearance date, based on in-game information.

All American Railway Transport



Introduction



Please note that some European and Asian vehicles do appear in America vehicle set. This guide contains:

  • Locomotives (1850 - 1935).
  • Locomotives (1936 - 2010).
  • Multiple Units.
  • Passenger Wagons.
  • Cargo Wagons (1850 - 1900).
  • Cargo Wagons (1950 - 2000).
  • Trams.

Locomotives (1850 - 1935)



Baldwin's Six-Wheels | From 1850 To

This triple-coupled steam locomotive was designed by Matthias Baldwin in 1842. His aim was to use the entire weight for power transmission.

  • Cost: $258,664
  • Running costs: $43,111/year
  • Top speed: 40 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 70 kW
  • Tractive effort: 25 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 75
  • Weight: 20 t
  • Lifespan: 29 years
  • Length: m

4-4-0 The General | From 1858 To

This "American" type locomotive has been used very successfully on many railroad lines in the USA ans is also known from the Buster Keaton film "The General".

  • Cost: $4,76,012
  • Running costs: $79,335/year
  • Top speed: 45 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 130 kW
  • Tractive effort: 40 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 80
  • Weight: 40 t
  • Lifespan: 29 years
  • Length: m

2-8-0 Baldwin Class 56 | From 1871 To

The "Consolidation" was a standard freight locomotive and could pull twice as heavy trains at half the cost of its predecessors.

  • Cost: $1,029,862
  • Running costs: $171,644/year
  • Top speed: 60 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 284 kW
  • Tractive effort: 70 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 77
  • Weight: 50 t
  • Lifespan: 29 years
  • Length: m

2-6-0 Mogul | From 1885 To

The 2-6-0 axle arrangement was mainly used for tank locomotives. This type was often built in the USA between 1860 and 1930.

  • Cost: $1,455,916
  • Running costs: $242.653/year
  • Top speed: 75 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 400 kW
  • Tractive effort: 80 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 78
  • Weight: 122 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years
  • Length: m

Ten Wheeler | From 1896 To

A model of this freight and passenger locomotive was driven by Casey Jones on the night of his fatal crash on April 30, 1900. Due to his heroic behavior he is still celebrated as a hero.

  • Cost: $2,037,246
  • Running costs: $339,541/year
  • Top speed: 100 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 550 kW
  • Tractive effort: 160 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 74
  • Weight: 120 t
  • Lifespan: 49 years
  • Length: m

4-4-2 Atlantic | From 1902 To

This axis arrangement is known as Atlantic type, alternatively Milwaukee is also common.

  • Cost: $2,592,858
  • Running costs: $432,143/year
  • Top speed: 100 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 700 kW
  • Tractive effort: 100 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 76
  • Weight: 130 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years
  • Length: m

2-8-2 Mikado | From 1916 To

"Mikados" were most common freight locomotives until the end of the steam era. More than 9500 were used in the USA.

  • Cost: $4,281,212
  • Running costs: $713,535/year
  • Top speed: 80 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 1,173 kW
  • Tractive effort: 228 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 72
  • Weight: 219 t
  • Lifespan: 35 years
  • Length: m

MILW-Class EP-2 | From 1919 To

This locomotive, commonly known as "Bi-Polar", was one of the most interesting and complex ever developed. It consists of no less than three articulated parts.

  • Cost: $12,482,256
  • Running costs: $2,080,376/year
  • Top speed: 120 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 3,311 kW
  • Tractive effort: 516 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 69
  • Weight: 240 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years
  • Length: m

4-12-2 Class 9000 | From 1926 To

These locomotives were quite successful, but a nightmare for maintenance because of their internal third cylinders which powered the cranked second drive axles.

  • Cost: $13,119,858
  • Running costs: $2,186,643/year
  • Top speed: 100 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 3,542 kW
  • Tractive effort: 430 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 74
  • Weight: 355 t
  • Lifespan: 35 years
  • Length: m

ALCO HH 600 | From 1930 To

The ALCO HH Series was an early series of diesel-electric locomotives built by the American Locomotive Company (ALCO) in Schenectady, New York.

  • Cost: $1,642,408
  • Running costs: $273,735/year
  • Top speed: 80 km/h
  • Engine Type: Diesel
  • Power: 450 kW
  • Tractive effort: 125 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 69
  • Weight: 93 t
  • Lifespan: 35 years
  • Length: m

4-4-2 Hiawatha | From 1935 To

These high-speed "Atlantic" locomotives were fitted with streamlined fairings. They were built by ALCO to tow the Hiawatha passenger trains on Milwaukee Road.

  • Cost: $11,497,404
  • Running costs: $1,916,234/year
  • Top speed: 160 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 2,940 kW
  • Tractive effort: 136 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 73
  • Weight: 243 t
  • Lifespan: 35 years
  • Length: m

Locomotives (1936 - 2010)



PRR-Class GG1 | From 1936 To

With its beautiful, streamlined design, the GG1 not only looked good, it also reached high speeds and remained in service for many years.

  • Cost: $13,491,850
  • Running costs: $2,248,850/year
  • Top speed: 160 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 3,450 kW
  • Tractive effort: 291 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 68
  • Weight: 215 t
  • Lifespan: 44 years
  • Length: m

4-8-8-4 Big Boy | From 1944 To

This articulated locomotive was a real monster and used the latest steam locomotive technology. It was primarily used for towing freight trains.

  • Cost: $17,349,268
  • Running costs: $2,891,545/year
  • Top speed: 130 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 4,560 kW
  • Tractive effort: 602 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 72
  • Weight: 567 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years
  • Length: m

Alco PA | From 1946 To

The Alco PA series is often described as the most beautiful and aesthetic diesel locomotive ever built. P stands for "passenger" and A means "with driver's cab".

  • Cost: $6,734,152
  • Running costs: $1,122,359/year
  • Top speed: 188 km/h
  • Engine Type: Diesel
  • Power: 1,680 kW
  • Tractive effort: 227 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 69
  • Weight: 139 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years
  • Length: m

New Haven EP5 | From 1955 To

The New Haven EP-5 wass an electric locomotive from General Electric. Originally it was mainly used on the passenger route between New York City and New Haven.

  • Cost: $11,519,680
  • Running costs: $1,919,947/year
  • Top speed: 140 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 3,000 kW
  • Tractive effort: 151 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 63
  • Weight: 159 t
  • Lifespan: 55 years
  • Length: m

EMD GP 9 | From 1958 To

The GP9 series of GM's Electro-Motive Division was a great success and became one of the most successful diesel locomotives ever built.

  • Cost: $4,854,424
  • Running costs: $809,071/year
  • Top speed: 105 km/h
  • Engine Type: Diesel
  • Power: 1,305 kW
  • Tractive effort: 288 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 67
  • Weight: 117 t
  • Lifespan: 44 years
  • Length: m

EMD SD40-2 | From 1972 To

The SD40-2 are true icons of the American railroad. They can be found practically anywhere and in front of any train.

  • Cost: $11,159,592
  • Running costs: $1,859,932/year
  • Top speed: 105 km/h
  • Engine Type: Diesel
  • Power: 3,000 kW
  • Tractive effort: 410 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 71
  • Weight: 167 t
  • Lifespan: 49 years
  • Length: m

EMD AEM-7 | From 1975 To

This locomotive used the latest technology with thyristor control of the traction motors so that maximum power was available without wheel slip.

  • Cost: $17,493,492
  • Running costs: $2,915,582/year
  • Top speed: 200 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 4,320 kW
  • Tractive effort: 133 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 62
  • Weight: 92 t
  • Lifespan: 55 years
  • Length: m

GE C40-8W | From 1989 To

These six-axle diesel-elelctric locomotives were built by GE Transportation. They differ from Dash 8-40C by a wider safety cab.

  • Cost: $11,309,806
  • Running costs: $1,884,968/year
  • Top speed: 120 km/h
  • Engine Type: Diesel
  • Power: 3,000 kW
  • Tractive effort: 483 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 68
  • Weight: 177 t
  • Lifespan: 49 years
  • Length: m

Ge E60C-2 | From 1992 To

A type from Bombardier's family of electric and diesel-electric locomotives for use in medium freight and passenger trains.

  • Cost: $15,642,726
  • Running costs: $2,607,121/year
  • Top speed: 160 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 4,000 kW
  • Tractive effort: 334 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 65
  • Weight: 176 t
  • Lifespan: 49 years
  • Length: m

Ge P42 DC | From 2005 To

The GE Genesis series is unique among the currently built North American locomotives, because the locomotives are particularly light due to the full shell construction.

  • Cost: $12,396,860
  • Running costs: $2,066,143/year
  • Top speed: 160 km/h
  • Engine Type: Diesel
  • Power: 3,170 kW
  • Tractive effort: 280 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 67
  • Weight: 122 t
  • Lifespan: 55 years
  • Length: m

HHP 8 | From 2010 To

HHP-8 means "High Horse Power 8000". The twin cabin electric locomotive was manufactured for use by Westrail and the Maryland Regional Commuter System.

  • Cost: $24,296,516
  • Running costs: $4,049,419/year
  • Top speed: 200 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 6,000 kW
  • Tractive effort: 250 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 66
  • Weight: 100 t
  • Lifespan: 55 years
  • Length: m

Multiple Units



M-300 | From 1924 To

These railcars were called "Skunks" because people said: "You can smell them before you can see them".

  • Cost: $1,926,122
  • Running costs: $321,020/year
  • Top speed: 100 km/h
  • Engine Type: Diesel
  • Power: 200 kW
  • Tractive effort: 30 kN
  • Capacity: 20
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading Speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 72
  • Weight: 25 t
  • Lifespan: 35 years
  • Length:

Pioneer Zephyr | From 1934 To

Current in-game description is broken, it instead shows description for Russian ED9M.

  • Cost: $7,727,070
  • Running costs: $1,287,846/year
  • Top speed: 177 km/h
  • Engine Type: Diesel
  • Power: 448 kW
  • Tractive effort: 80 kN
  • Capacity: 52
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading Speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 71
  • Weight: 105 t
  • Lifespan: 35 years
  • Length:

Alco PA/PB | From 1946 To

The Alco PB is the cabless booster unit B which matched the PAs and increased the horsepower rating.

  • Cost: $13,468,304
  • Running costs: $2,244,718/year
  • Top speed: 188 km/h
  • Engine Type: Diesel
  • Power: 3,360 kW
  • Tractive effort: 454 kN
  • Emission: 69
  • Weight: 278 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years
  • Length:

Metroliner | From 1971 To

The Metroliner, as extra-fare express trains between Washington, D.C. and New York City, used self-powered electric multiple unit cars.

  • Cost: $13,983,974
  • Running costs: $2,330,662/year
  • Top speed: 193 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 890 kW
  • Tractive effort: 340 kN
  • Capacity: 81
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading Speed: 5.0x
  • Emission: 62
  • Weight: 234 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years
  • Length:

Speedance Express | From 2000 To

Speedance Express trains are the fastest trainsets in the Americas, attaining 150 mph in revenue service an the North East Corridor. They use tilting technology to travel at higher speeds.

  • Cost: $54,845,220
  • Running costs: $9,140,870/year
  • Top speed: 240 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 9,200 kW
  • Tractive effort: 240 kN
  • Capacity: 102
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading Speed: 12.0x
  • Emission: 66
  • Weight: 564 t
  • Lifespan: 49 years
  • Length:

Avelia Liberty | From 2021 To

The Avelia Liberty is a TGV-based high-speed train adapted for North america. With appropriate infrastructure and tilting technology speeds up to 299km/h are possible, without tilting 350km/h are possible.

  • Cost: $55,766,532
  • Running costs: $9,294,422/year
  • Top speed: 300 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 5,000 kW
  • Tractive effort: 200 kN
  • Capacity: 162
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading Speed: 9.0x
  • Emission: 65
  • Weight: 748 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length:

Passenger Wagons



Passenger Car | From 1850 To

An early passenger car that offers little comfort.

  • Cost: $407,826
  • Running costs: $76,971/year
  • Top speed: 50 km/h
  • Capacity: 14
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 70
  • Weight: 20 t
  • Lifespan: 25 years
  • Length: m

Passenger Car with Clearstory | From 1875 To

A passenger car with clearstory that provides better ventilation and comfort.

  • Cost: $747,478
  • Running costs: $124,580/year
  • Top speed: 80 km/h
  • Capacity: 16
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 66
  • Weight: 25 t
  • Lifespan: 30 years
  • Length: m

Six-Axle Passenger Car | From 1900 To

Heavy passenger car with more comfort to serve the long distances across the USA.

  • Cost: $1,315,134
  • Running costs: $219,189/year
  • Top speed: 110 km/h
  • Capacity: 20
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 65
  • Weight: 40 t
  • Lifespan: 30 years
  • Length: m

Heavyweight 28-1 Parlor | From 1915 To

The classic "Pullman Heavyweight" passenger coach was an institution; it was widely used in American railroads.

  • Cost: $2,178,276
  • Running costs: $363,046/year
  • Top speed: 180 km/h
  • Capacity: 19
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 63
  • Weight: 35 t
  • Lifespan: 35 years
  • Length: m

Streamlined Coach New Mexico | From 1935 To

As the first attempt to make passenger cars lighter, this type was made of aluminium with corrugated side walls.

  • Cost: $1,67,132
  • Running costs: $279,022/year
  • Top speed: 150 km/h
  • Capacity: 18
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 61
  • Weight: 30 t
  • Lifespan: 35 years
  • Length: m

All America Golden Sand | From 1950 To

The former Southern Pacific "Golden sand" was operated by All America. Built entirely of aluminium and equipped with advanced machinery and operating systems.

  • Cost: $2,178,276
  • Running costs: $363,046/year
  • Top speed: 180 km/h
  • Capacity: 19
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 62
  • Weight: 35 t
  • Lifespan: 35 years
  • Length: m

Westrail Westfleet | From 1971 To

Westfleet is a fleet of single-decker intercity passenger cars built by the Budd Company for Westrail. the design is based on the former Metroliner electric multiple units.

  • Cost: $2,721,210
  • Running costs: $453,535/year
  • Top speed: 200 km/h
  • Capacity: 21
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 61
  • Weight: 53 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years
  • Length: m

Bombardier BiLevel | From 1976 To

Bombardier BiLevel cars were designed to transport a large number of passengers on local traffic. They are easily recognizable by their shape, which resembles an elongated octagon.

  • Cost: $2,838,448
  • Running costs: $473,075/year
  • Top speed: 140 km/h
  • Capacity: 33
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 61
  • Weight: 50 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years
  • Length: m

Cargo Wagons (1850 - 1900)



Boxcar | From 1850 To

A closed freight car to transport all kinds of freight. Their generalized design makes loading slower, but also more flexible.

  • Cost: $203,912
  • Running costs: $33,985/year
  • Top speed: 50 km/h
  • Capacity: 7
  • Cargo type: Plastic, Machines, Tools, Food, Goods
  • Loading speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 70
  • Weight: 10 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years
  • Length: m

Flatcar with side stakes | From 1850 To

A flatcar with a wooden deck and stakes on both sides. Mainly for loads that are too bulky for loading in closed coaches.

  • Cost: $203,912
  • Running costs: $33,985/year
  • Top speed: 50 km/h
  • Capacity: 7
  • Cargo type: Logs, Steel, Planks, Construction material
  • Loading speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 86
  • Weight: 8.0 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years
  • Length: m

Gondola | From 1850 To

Early coaches of this ind were built to transport coal. Than name "gondola" derives from the fact that coal was previously transported on shallow water boats, so-called "gondolas".

  • Cost: $203,912
  • Running costs: $33,985/year
  • Top speed: 50 km/h
  • Capacity: 7
  • Cargo type: Coal, Iron Ore, Stone, Grain
  • Loading speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 70
  • Weight: 10 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years
  • Length: m

Tank car | From 1850 To

It was not until oil was discovered in the 1860s that railroads needed to develop this new type of coach for transporting liquids.

  • Cost: $203,912
  • Running costs: $33,985/year
  • Top speed: 50 km/h
  • Capacity: 7
  • Cargo type: Crude oil, Oil, Fuel
  • Loading speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 70
  • Weight: 10 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years
  • Length: m

Boxcar | From 1900 To

The boxcar is not the simplest type of freight car, but it can carry most different loads. Some of them were even loaded with coal.

  • Cost: $560,608
  • Running costs: $93,435/year
  • Top speed: 80 km/h
  • Capacity: 12
  • Cargo type: Plastic, Machines, Tools, Food, Goods
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 66
  • Weight: 15 t
  • Lifespan: 45 years
  • Length: m

Flatcar with side stakes | From 1900 To

A flatcar with center beam, designed for the transport of long and bulky goods. The struts on the underside provide additional load-bearing capacity.

  • Cost: $560,608
  • Running costs: $93,435/year
  • Top speed: 80 km/h
  • Capacity: 12
  • Cargo type: Logs, Steel, Planks, Construction material
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 62
  • Weight: 12 t
  • Lifespan: 45 years
  • Length: m

Gondola | From 1900 To

Essentially a flatcar with side walls used to transport goods that can be dumped or shoveled.

  • Cost: $560,608
  • Running costs: $93,435/year
  • Top speed: 80 km/h
  • Capacity: 12
  • Cargo type: Coal, Iron Ore, Stone, Grain
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 66
  • Weight: 15 t
  • Lifespan: 45 years
  • Length: m

Tank car | From 1900 To

A tank car can transport liquid or gaseous raw materials. It was not until 1900 that safety standards were introduced, although thousands of these coaches were already in use.

  • Cost: $560,608
  • Running costs: $93,435/year
  • Top speed: 80 km/h
  • Capacity: 12
  • Cargo type: Crude oil, Oil, Fuel
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 66
  • Weight: 15 t
  • Lifespan: 45 years
  • Length: m

Cargo Wagons (1950 - 2000)



Boxcar | From 1950 To

In order to save weight, the walls of this coach were made of aluminium. Passenger cars were also transported until the 1960s, after which car transporters took over the task.

  • Cost: $1,302,890
  • Running costs: $217,148/year
  • Top speed: 120 km/h
  • Capacity: 18
  • Cargo type: Plastic, Machines, Tools, Food, Goods
  • Loading speed: 3.0x
  • Emission: 64
  • Weight: 25 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Flatcar with stakes | From 1950 To

A flatcar with center beam and four axles. This type of coach is also called a "skeleton" because the wagon has no floor but only lateral arms.

  • Cost: $1,302,890
  • Running costs: $217,148/year
  • Top speed: 120 km/h
  • Capacity: 18
  • Cargo type: Logs, Steel, Planks, Construction material
  • Loading speed: 3.0x
  • Emission: 61
  • Weight: 15 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Gondola | From 1950 To

As an alternative to emptying, these gondolas are tilted using flaps, sometimes in a special device together with a rail.

  • Cost: $1,302,890
  • Running costs: $217,148/year
  • Top speed: 120 km/h
  • Capacity: 18
  • Cargo type: Coal, Iron Ore, Stone, Grain
  • Loading speed: 3.0x
  • Emission: 59
  • Weight: 20 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Tank car | From 1950 To

Competition from pipelines and trucks in the 1950s made it necessary to build larger tank cars. This four-axle version was designed to particularly high loads.

  • Cost: $1,302,890
  • Running costs: $217,148/year
  • Top speed: 120 km/h
  • Capacity: 18
  • Cargo type: Crude oil, Oil, Fuel
  • Loading speed: 3.0x
  • Emission: 59
  • Weight: 20 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Boxcar | From 2000 To

This closed freight car has a particularly large volume. It can be divided into several areas, whereby only one person is required for operation.

  • Cost: $2,002,268
  • Running costs: $333,711/year
  • Top speed: 160 km/h
  • Capacity: 20
  • Cargo type: Plastic, Machines, Tools, Food, Goods
  • Loading speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 60
  • Weight: 25 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Flatcar with side stakes | From 2000 To

This modern flatcar with side stakes can be loaded with various goods. Loading is possible from above, from the side and also from the front thanks to flaps.

  • Cost: $2,002,268
  • Running costs: $333,711/year
  • Top speed: 160 km/h
  • Capacity: 20
  • Cargo type: Logs, Steel, Planks, Construction material
  • Loading speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 60
  • Weight: 25 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Gondola | From 2000 To

This bulk railcar has a self-discharging mechanism on both sides. A hydraulic pump is available for this and a manual pump for emergencies.

  • Cost: $2,002,268
  • Running costs: $333,711/year
  • Top speed: 160 km/h
  • Capacity: 20
  • Cargo type: Coal, Iron Ore, Stone, Grain
  • Loading speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 60
  • Weight: 25 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Tank car | From 2000 To

This modern 4-axle tanker can be equipped with various loading and unloading equipment to meet the different needs of railroad companies.

  • Cost: $2,002,268
  • Running costs: $333,711/year
  • Top speed: 160 km/h
  • Capacity: 20
  • Cargo type: Crude oil, Oil, Fuel
  • Loading speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 60
  • Weight: 25 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Trams



Horse-Drawn Streetcar USA | From 1850 To

In the United States, the very first streetcar appeared on November 26, 1832. The earliest streetcars used horses and sometimes mules.

  • Cost: $29,862
  • Running costs: $4,977/year
  • Top speed: 18 km/h
  • Engine Type: Horse
  • Power: 2.0 kW
  • Tractive effort: 2.0 kN
  • Capacity: 5
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 67
  • Weight: 1.0 t
  • Lifespan: 29 years

Horse-Drawn Streetcar USA | From 1871 To

In the mid-1880s, 188 million passengers per year were carried in the USA. The average streetcar horse had a life expectancy of about two years.

  • Cost: $39,126
  • Running costs: $6,521/year
  • Top speed: 20 km/h
  • Engine Type: Horse
  • Power: 2.0 kW
  • Tractive effort: 2.0 kN
  • Capacity: 6
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 63
  • Weight: 1.0 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years

San Diego Electric Trolley | From 1893 To

The citizens Traction Company converted old cable cars into electric streetcars. later the San Diego Electric railway took over the company and switched everything to normal gauge.

  • Cost: $55,349
  • Running costs: $9,225/year
  • Top speed: 25 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 4.0 kW
  • Tractive effort: 10 kN
  • Capacity: 7
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 3.0x
  • Emission: 71
  • Weight: 8.0 t
  • Lifespan: 29 years

Peter Witt Streetcar | From 1917 To

designed by Peter Witt, this streetcar was used in many North American cities, expecially Toronto and Cleveland. Typical is the use of the center door as an exit.

  • Cost: $214,813
  • Running costs: $35,802/year
  • Top speed: 35 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 40 kW
  • Tractive effort: 15 kN
  • Capacity: 20
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 69
  • Weight: 12 t
  • Lifespan: 35 years

PCC 1643 Pittsburgh | From 1940 To

The PCC (Presidents' Conference Committee) streetcar design proved to be very successful, in Pittsburgh, for example, 666 PCCs operated on 68 routes.

  • Cost: $286,645
  • Running costs: $47,774/year
  • Top speed: 45 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 100 kW
  • Tractive effort: 24 kN
  • Capacity: 21
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 71
  • Weight: 16 t
  • Lifespan: 35 years

Toronto PCC A-7 | From 1954 To

Also from PCC, the A-7 ran on the busiest line of Toronto, the Bloor line. It was supposed to fight the upcoming traffic jams, but 56 light signals per round obstructed the streetcar traffic.

  • Cost: $272,344
  • Running costs: $45,391/year
  • Top speed: 50 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 144 kW
  • Tractive effort: 30 kN
  • Capacity: 18
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 69
  • Weight: 17 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years

Toronto CRLV | From 1976 To

The CLRV (Canadian Light Rail Vehicle) was a successful attempt to replace the aging PCCs with a modern, standardized streetcar.

  • Cost: $362,771
  • Running costs: $60,462/year
  • Top speed: 60 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 272 kW
  • Tractive effort: 50 kN
  • Capacity: 20
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 67
  • Weight: 23 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years

Skoda 10 T | From 2000 To

The Skoda 10 T is a low-floor streetcar manufactured by Skoda Transportation.

  • Cost: $530,130
  • Running costs: $88,355/year
  • Top speed: 70 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 360 kW
  • Tractive effort: 100 kN
  • Capacity: 25
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 5.0x
  • Emission: 67
  • Weight: 29 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years

Be 5/6 Cobra | From 2001 To

The continuous low-floor Cobra streetcar is called that because it "winds" its way through the city with its four joints.

  • Cost: $816,234
  • Running costs: $136,039/year
  • Top speed: 60 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 625 kW
  • Tractive effort: 80 kN
  • Capacity: 45
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 5.0x
  • Emission: 65
  • Weight: 39 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years

CAF Urbos 3 | From 2018 To

There are currently three series of Urbos railcars. The first Urbos 3 series went into service on 21 March 2011 for the Seville streetcar line.

  • Cost: $911,824
  • Running costs: $151,971/year
  • Top speed: 70 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 800 kW
  • Tractive effort: 80 kN
  • Capacity: 43
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 5.0x
  • Emission: 65
  • Weight: 35 t
  • Lifespan: 35 years

W.I.P.