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Transport Fever 2 - Railway Vehicle List (Asia)

Written by wide range asbestos   /   Dec 19, 2019    


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A complete list of all purchasable railway vehicles in the game with their stats, ordered by appearance date, based on in-game information.

Intro



Please note that some European and American vehicles do appear in Asia vehicle set.

In this guide there are railway vehicles:

  • Locomotives (1850 - 1927) 
  • Locomotives (1931 - 2009) 
  • Multiple Units 
  • Passenger Wagons 
  • Cargo Wagons (1850 - 1900) 
  • Cargo Wagons (1950 - 2000) 
  • Trams

Locomotives (1850 - 1927)



Russian Class V Type 1 | From 1850 To

This type 2-2-0 locomotive was used as a passenger locomotive on the route from St. Petersburg to Msocow. The large drive wheels made high speeds possible.

  • Cost: $219,698
  • Running costs: $36,616/year
  • Top speed: 45 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 60 kW
  • Tractive effort: 26 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 75
  • Weight: 33 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Russian Class T Type 1 | From 1857 To

The T series locomotive was widely used. In the beginning they were built without a driving cab, but later they were retrofitted to protect the crew in bad weather.

  • Cost: $508,252
  • Running costs: $84,709/year
  • Top speed: 55 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 140 kW
  • Tractive effort: 30 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 79
  • Weight: 30 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Russian Class GV | From 1863 To

This locomotive was purchased for freight train traffic on the line from Petersburg to Warsaw. The first models were built by factories in England, France, Belgium and Austria.

  • Cost: $689,772
  • Running costs: $114,962/year
  • Top speed: 55 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 190 kW
  • Tractive effort: 50 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 75
  • Weight: 31 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Russian Class B | From 1871 To

Series B locomotives were built in Moscow. Among the special features is a steam jet feed pump without moving parts, developed by the entrepreneur Alexander Friedmann.

  • Cost: $873,912
  • Running costs: $145,652/year
  • Top speed: 50 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 240 kW
  • Tractive effort: 60 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 79
  • Weight: 35 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Russian Class PV | From 1877 To

Locomotives of this series were built in Kolomna on the basis of a Borsig locomotive. Later models were equipped with then revolutionary Westinghouse brakes.

  • Cost: $1,088,014
  • Running costs: $181,336/year
  • Top speed: 64 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 300 kW
  • Tractive effort: 60 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 77
  • Weight: 31 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Russian Class F Fairlie | From 1884 To

The most characteristic feature of this locomotive is its symmetry. It is ideal for complex route profiles with tight curves and steep climbs.

  • Cost: $1,135,104
  • Running costs: $189,184/year
  • Top speed: 45 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 310 kW
  • Tractive effort: 130 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 78
  • Weight: 90 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Russian Class OB | From 1890 To

The so-called "Snovnoy" became the first main locomotive of the Russian railway fleet. Between 1890 and 1915 more than 9000 units were produced in twelve factories.

  • Cost: $1,599,188
  • Running costs: $266,531/year
  • Top speed: 60 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 441 kW
  • Tractive effort: 95 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 78
  • Weight: 52 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Russian Class SCH | From 1906 To

With the increase of freight trains during the late 19th century, after the purchace of locomotives from the USA, it was decided to build this type of locomotive in Kharkov.

  • Cost: $1,674,304
  • Running costs: $279,051/year
  • Top speed: 75 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 460 kW
  • Tractive effort: 150 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 74
  • Weight: 78 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Russian Class S | From 1910 To

At the beginning of 20th century, stocks of high-quality coal were running low. This locomotive was designed in such a way that it could also be operated with inferior coal.

  • Cost: $3,302,550
  • Running costs: $550,425/year
  • Top speed: 115 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 880 kW
  • Tractive effort: 140 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 74
  • Weight: 76 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Russian Class YE | From 1915 To

Over 3000 units of this locomotive were built in the USA during the First World War for Russia and the Soviet Union. It was designed by Russian engineers.

  • Cost: $3,632,054
  • Running costs: $605,342/year
  • Top speed: 70 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 1,000 kW
  • Tractive effort: 229 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 76
  • Weight: 103 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

China Railways JF1 | From 1918 To

This locomotive was originally introduced to cope with the increasing freight traffic during the First World war on the South Manchuria railway.

  • Cost: $4,197,266
  • Running costs: $699,544/year
  • Top speed: 80 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 1,150 kW
  • Tractive effort: 250 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 75
  • Weight: 100 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Russian Class SU | From 1927 To

This new design, which could also be operated with inferior coal after World War I, was so successful that it was used for decades.

  • Cost: $4,552,264
  • Running costs: $758,711/year
  • Top speed: 115 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 1,213 kW
  • Tractive effort: 104 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 75
  • Weight: 85 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Locomotives (1931 - 2009)



Russian Class FD | From 1931 To

The planning of this locomotive only took 100 days and the average construction time was 170 days.

  • Cost: $8,348,378
  • Running costs: $1,391,396/year
  • Top speed: 85 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 2,280 kW
  • Tractive effort: 233 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 74
  • Weight: 134 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Russian Class L | From 1947 To

This powerful 1-5-0 type was one of the most reliable and popular locomotives in the Soviet Union. It was in service with more than 4000 units.

  • Cost: $5,912,672
  • Running costs: $985,445/year
  • Top speed: 80 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 1,620 kW
  • Tractive effort: 221 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 73
  • Weight: 102 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Russian Class P36 | From 1954 To

This locomotive represents the technical highlight of Soviet steam train construction. Among other innovations, it has a mechanical coal supply.

  • Cost: $8,559,100
  • Running costs: $1,426,517/year
  • Top speed: 125 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 2,260 kW
  • Tractive effort: 170 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 71
  • Weight: 135 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Russian Class TE3 | From 1956 To

In the 1960s, the TE3 was the main freight locomotive for all non-electrified routes.

  • Cost: $4,578,246
  • Running costs: $763,041/year
  • Top speed: 100 km/h
  • Engine Type: Diesel
  • Power: 1,236 kW
  • Tractive effort: 285 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 71
  • Weight: 126 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

China Railways RM | Form 1958 To

The RM was China's last steam passenger design. It was a pre-war development of the successful SL6 Pacific.

  • Cost: $3,885,622
  • Running costs: $647,604/year
  • Top speed: 110 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 1,040 kW
  • Tractive effort: 180 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 72
  • Weight: 80 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Russian Class CHS4 | From 1966 To

The locomotive has been improved and redesigned several times to achieve the required traction. It reached a speed of 200 km/h.

  • Cost: $19,944,476
  • Running costs: $3,324,079/year
  • Top speed: 160 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 5,100 kW
  • Tractive effort: 300 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 66
  • Weight: 123 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

China railways DF5 | From 1976 To

After the introduction of an improved engine, more than 1000 units of this locomotive were successfully built.

  • Cost: $4,379,756
  • Running costs: $729,959/year
  • Top speed: 80 km/h
  • Engine Type: Diesel
  • Power: 1,200 kW
  • Tractive effort: 325 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 67
  • Weight: 138 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Russian Class VL80S | From 1982 To

Built for 33 years, the VL80 series is regarded as the longest built locomotive of the Soviet Union. Early models used a rectifier with mercury vapor, later models used silicon.

  • Cost: $24,359,860
  • Running costs: $4,059,977/year
  • Top speed: 110 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 6,520 kW
  • Tractive effort: 662 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 65
  • Weight: 192 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

China Railways DF4B | From 1984 To

This locomotive is part of the DF4 series, the most frequently used locomotive in China for passenger and freight traffic.

  • Cost: $9,990,328
  • Running costs: $1,665,055/year
  • Top speed: 120 km/h
  • Engine Type: Diesel
  • Power: 2,650 kW
  • Tractive effort: 243 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 72
  • Weight: 138 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

China railways SS9G | From 1998 To

Thanks to its six-axle design, the "Shaoshan 9" can provide high power and traction required to cope with steep tracks.

  • Cost: $18,940,180
  • Running costs: $3,156,697/year
  • Top speed: 170 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 4,800 kW
  • Tractive effort: 169 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 63
  • Weight: 126 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

China Railways HXD3B | From 2009 To

The HXD3B is a freight locomotive that can pull heavy compositions thanks to its particularly high power. It is equipped with a refrigerator, microwave and toilet.

  • Cost: $27,149,536
  • Running costs: $4,523,923/year
  • Top speed: 120 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 7,200 kW
  • Tractive effort: 506 kN
  • Loading Speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 65
  • Weight: 150 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Multiple Units



Russian class TE3 | From 1956 To

In the 1960s, the TE3 was the main freight locomotive or all non-electrified routes.

  • Cost: $9,156,492
  • Running costs: $1,526,082/year
  • Top speed: 100 km/h
  • Engine Type: Diesel
  • Power: 2,472 kW
  • Tractive effort: 570 kN
  • Emission: 71
  • Weight: 252 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length:

Shinkansen 0 Series | From 1964 To

The first of the Shinkansen high-speed train 0 was built in contrast to previous Japanese trains in the standard gauge. They are designed for high speed and high acceleration.

  • Cost: $47,551,552
  • Running costs: $7,925,256/year
  • Top speed: 220 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 5,920 kW
  • Tractive effort: 640 kN
  • Capacity: 160
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading Speed: 8.0x
  • Emission: 65
  • Weight: 440 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length:

ED9M | From 1995 To

The trains of the series ED9M are equipped with wear-free recuperation brakes. This allows during braking a partial recovery of kinetic energy as electrical energy.

  • Cost: $ [fix me]
  • Running costs: $[fixme]/year
  • Top speed: [fix me] km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 1,560 kW
  • Tractive effort: 220 kN
  • Capacity: 88
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading Speed: 16.0x
  • Emission: 62
  • Weight: 180 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length:

PA2 | From 2005 To

The PA2 has been designed for use on non-electrified high-traffic sections and is specifically designed for climatically difficult environments.

  • Cost: $ [fifme]
  • Running costs: $[fixme]/year
  • Top speed: [fixme] km/h
  • Engine Type: Diesel
  • Power: 700 kW
  • Tractive effort: 120 kN
  • Capacity: 60
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading Speed: 9.0x
  • Emission: 67
  • Weight: 131 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length:

The Lastochka | From 2013 To

The Lastochka is eqquipped with a electric dual-system. This allows the trains to run on the DC powered Black Sea lines as well as the Adler-Krasnaya Polyana region, which uses AC voltage.

  • Cost: $[fixme]
  • Running costs: $[fixme]/year
  • Top speed: [fixme] km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 2,550 kW
  • Tractive effort: 330 kN
  • Capacity: 115
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading Speed: 20.0x
  • Emission: 61
  • Weight: 265 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length:

Unknown | From 2016 To

This modern high-speed train is designed for speeds up to 400 km/h. During a test two trains passed each other at 420 km/h, a relative speed of 840 km/h to each other.

  • Cost: $[fixme]
  • Running costs: $[fixme]/year
  • Top speed: [fixme] km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 10,400 kW
  • Tractive effort: 640 kN
  • Capacity: 144
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading Speed: 8.0x
  • Emission: 61
  • Weight: 544 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length:

Passenger Wagons



Nikolas | From 1850 To

This early passenger car had neither a toilet, nor possibilities for luggage storage. the compartments were insulated and heated.

  • Cost: $307,442
  • Running costs: $51,240/year
  • Top speed: 40 km/h
  • Capacity: 13
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 64
  • Weight: 20 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Russo Balt | From 1870 To

This 3-axle passenger car was built in large numbers and used until the 1950s.

  • Cost: $382,934
  • Running costs: $63,822/year
  • Top speed: 60 km/h
  • Capacity: 11
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 66
  • Weight: 15 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Putilov | From 1890 To

This passenger car was one of the last to be built with 3 axles. It was used for different classes and was accordingly painted differently.

  • Cost: $645,044
  • Running costs: $109,007/year
  • Top speed: 80 km/h
  • Capacity: 14
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: .0x
  • Emission: 65
  • Weight: 20 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Suburban | From 1910 To

This passenger car from early 20th century is one of the first models with trucks. A toilet is also part of the equipment.

  • Cost: $1,126,042
  • Running costs: $187,674/year
  • Top speed: 100 km/h
  • Capacity: 19
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 62
  • Weight: 35 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Egorov 20 2 | From 1930 To

This 4-axle passenger car was manufactured in Kalinin and was later used as a mobile infirmary.

  • Cost: $1,185,306
  • Running costs: $197,551/year
  • Top speed: 100 km/h
  • Capacity: 20
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 61
  • Weight: 40 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

China Type YZ 22 | From 1950 To

The Type 22 is the second generation of the most important types of passenger coaches in China and was produced in a wide variety of designs.

  • Cost: $1,520,038
  • Running costs: $253,340/year
  • Top speed: 120 km/h
  • Capacity: 21
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 64
  • Weight: 45 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

China Type 25 | From 1970 To

The Type 25 was produced over a period of almost 40 years and underwent a large number of revisions.

  • Cost: $1,892,300
  • Running costs: $315,383/year
  • Top speed: 140 km/h
  • Capacity: 22
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 63
  • Weight: 40 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

China Type 25C | From 1990 To

The Type 25C is a further development of the Type 25 series and is designed for particularly high speeds.

  • Cost: $2,302,608
  • Running costs: $383,768/year
  • Top speed: 160 km/h
  • Capacity: 23
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 60
  • Weight: 40 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

TVZ 61 4447 | From 2010 To

Coaches of this series are intended for long distances and are also available in couchette and sleeping car configurations.

  • Cost: $2,980,372
  • Running costs: $496,729/year
  • Top speed: 200 km/h
  • Capacity: 23
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: .0x
  • Emission: 58
  • Weight: 40 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Cargo Wagons (1850 - 1900)



Boxcar | From 1850 To

This standard freight car found wide use and was built on many special variants. Coaches of this type were built until 1930s.

  • Cost: $203,912
  • Running costs: $33,985/year
  • Top speed: 50 km/h
  • Capacity: 7
  • Cargo type: Plastic, Machines, Tools, Food, Goods
  • Loading speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 70
  • Weight: 10 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Flatcar with stakes | From 1850 To

In this early freight car, both platform and the frame itself are made of wood. Steel girders were only used later.

  • Cost: $203,912
  • Running costs: $33,985/year
  • Top speed: 50 km/h
  • Capacity: 7
  • Cargo type: Logs, Steel, Planks, Construction material
  • Loading speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 70
  • Weight: 10 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Gondola | From 1850 To

An early 2-axle bulk railcar. Coaches of this type still had to be braked by hand and therefore have a small platform for the brakeman.

  • Cost: $203,912
  • Running costs: $33,985/year
  • Top speed: 50 km/h
  • Capacity: 7
  • Cargo type: Coal, Iron Ore, Stone, Grain
  • Loading speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 70
  • Weight: 10 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Tank car | From 1850 To

The forst tanker trucks were simply flatbed cars on which a tank was mounted.

  • Cost: $203,912
  • Running costs: $33,985/year
  • Top speed: 50 km/h
  • Capacity: 7
  • Cargo type: Crude oil, Oil, Fuel
  • Loading speed: 1.0x
  • Emission: 70
  • Weight: 10 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Boxcar | From 1900 To

A later model of the standard freight car from the early 20th century, equipped with a platform for the brakeman.

  • Cost: $560,608
  • Running costs: $93,435/year
  • Top speed: 80 km/h
  • Capacity: 12
  • Cargo type: Plastic, Machines, Tools, Food, Goods
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 62
  • Weight: 20 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Flatcar with side stakes | From 1900 To

This flatcar with the side stakes for the St. Peterburg to Moscow route was equipped with racks to prevent goods from slipping sideways.

  • Cost: $560,608
  • Running costs: $93,435/year
  • Top speed: 80 km/h
  • Capacity: 12
  • Cargo type: Logs, Steel, Planks, Construction material
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 62
  • Weight: 20 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Gondola | From 1900 To

Some of the boxcars were converted into bulk railcars by simply separating the upper part of the coach and the roof.

  • Cost: $560,608
  • Running costs: $93,435/year
  • Top speed: 80 km/h
  • Capacity: 12
  • Cargo type: Coal, Iron Ore, Stone, Grain
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 62
  • Weight: 20 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Tank car | From 1900 To

In contrast to some earlier tanker trucks, this was bult on Russia in the early 20th century and was mostly used for the transport of petroleum.

  • Cost: $560,608
  • Running costs: $93,435/year
  • Top speed: 80 km/h
  • Capacity: 12
  • Cargo type: Crude oil, Oil, Fuel
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 62
  • Weight: 20 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Cargo Wagons (1950 - 2000)



Boxcar | From 1950 To

This closed freight car has a capacity of 120 cubic meters and has been specially designed to provide protection against theft, adverse weather conditions or mechanical overloads.

  • Cost: $1,302,890
  • Running costs: $217,148/year
  • Top speed: 120 km/h
  • Capacity: 18
  • Cargo type: Plastic, Machines, Tools, Food, Goods
  • Loading speed: 3.0x
  • Emission: 62
  • Weight: 30 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Flatcar with stakes | From 1950 To

With this 4-axle flatcar with side stakes, the side frames and end walls can be removed separately as required.

  • Cost: $1,302,890
  • Running costs: $217,148/year
  • Top speed: 120 km/h
  • Capacity: 18
  • Cargo type: Logs, Steel, Planks, Construction material
  • Loading speed: 3.0x
  • Emission: 62
  • Weight: 30 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Gondola | From 1950 To

This bulk railcar has three axles per truck to enable heavy loading.

  • Cost: $1,302,890
  • Running costs: $217,148/year
  • Top speed: 120 km/h
  • Capacity: 18
  • Cargo type: Coal, Iron Ore, Stone, Grain
  • Loading speed: 3.0x
  • Emission: 62
  • Weight: 30 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Tank car | From 1950 To

This 4-axle tanker truck was built in various designs for the transport of various liquids.

  • Cost: $1,302,890
  • Running costs: $217,148/year
  • Top speed: 120 km/h
  • Capacity: 18
  • Cargo type: Crude oil, Oil, Fuel
  • Loading speed: 3.0x
  • Emission: 62
  • Weight: 30 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Boxcar | From 2000 To

This closed freight car has a particularly large volume. It can be divided into several areas, whereby only one person is required for operation.

  • Cost: $2,002,268
  • Running costs: $333,711/year
  • Top speed: 160 km/h
  • Capacity: 20
  • Cargo type: Plastic, Machines, Tools, Food, Goods
  • Loading speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 60
  • Weight: 25 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Flatcar with side stakes | From 2000 To

This modern flatcar with side stakes can be loaded with various goods. Loading is possible from above, from the side and also from the front thanks to flaps.

  • Cost: $2,002,268
  • Running costs: $333,711/year
  • Top speed: 160 km/h
  • Capacity: 20
  • Cargo type: Logs, Steel, Planks, Construction material
  • Loading speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 60
  • Weight: 25 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Gondola | From 2000 To

This bulk railcar has a self-discharging mechanism on both sides. A hydraulic pump is available for this and a manual pump for emergencies.

  • Cost: $2,002,268
  • Running costs: $333,711/year
  • Top speed: 160 km/h
  • Capacity: 20
  • Cargo type: Coal, Iron Ore, Stone, Grain
  • Loading speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 60
  • Weight: 25 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Tank car | From 2000 To

This modern 4-axle tanker can be equipped with various loading and unloading equipment to meet the different needs of railroad companies.

  • Cost: $2,002,268
  • Running costs: $333,711/year
  • Top speed: 160 km/h
  • Capacity: 20
  • Cargo type: Crude oil, Oil, Fuel
  • Loading speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 60
  • Weight: 25 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years
  • Length: m

Trams



Odessa Horse-Drawn Streetcar | From 1850 To

The first horse-drawn streetcar in the city of Odessa was put into operation thanks to the support of a Belgian company.

  • Cost: $29,862
  • Running costs: $4,977/year
  • Top speed: 18 km/h
  • Engine Type: Horse
  • Power: 2.0 kW
  • Tractive effort: 2.0 kN
  • Capacity: 5
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 67
  • Weight: 1.0 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years

St. Petersurg Streetcar | From 1863 To

The first streetcar in St. Petersburg to be built on Russian broad gauge. In the two-story coach people would sometimes step on others' heads when dismounting from the vehicle.

  • Cost: $45,647
  • Running costs: $7,608/year
  • Top speed: 20 km/h
  • Engine Type: Horse
  • Power: 2.0 kW
  • Tractive effort: 2.0 kN
  • Capacity: 7
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 2.0x
  • Emission: 67
  • Weight: 1.5 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years

Ivan | From 1882 To

The tracks of this streetcar were laid through fields and sparsely built-up areas because of the danger of sparks and fires.

  • Cost: $90,055
  • Running costs: $15,009/year
  • Top speed: 26 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 30 kW
  • Tractive effort: 15 kN
  • Capacity: 11
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 3.0x
  • Emission: 79
  • Weight: 8.0 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years

Kolomna | From 1904 To

The first vehicle ever produced at the Kolomna Locomotive Works was a steam-powered freight locomotive.

  • Cost: $111,767
  • Running costs: $18,628/year
  • Top speed: 30 km/h
  • Engine Type: Steam
  • Power: 30 kW
  • Tractive effort: 20 kN
  • Capacity: 12
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 79
  • Weight: 8.0 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years

Moscow F | From 1908 To

Literally called a "Lantern", these streetcars circulated for over 50 years in the city of Moscow. More than 600 streetcars of this model were built.

  • Cost: $257,775
  • Running costs: $42,963/year
  • Top speed: 35 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 50 kW
  • Tractive effort: 20 kN
  • Capacity: 24
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 72
  • Weight: 18 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years

DL 3000 Witt | From 1930 To

Built in Japan in the 1930s, these streetcars resemble Witt streetcars and are still in use in the Chinese city of Dalian.

  • Cost: $176,964
  • Running costs: $29,494/year
  • Top speed: 30 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 100 kW
  • Tractive effort: 30 kN
  • Capacity: 19
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 67
  • Weight: 12 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years

KTM 1 | From 1947 To

This two-axle streetcar was built after the Second World War and was the first single-axle streetcar manufactured by the Soviet Union.

  • Cost: $304,656
  • Running costs: $50,776/year
  • Top speed: 40 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 92 kW
  • Tractive effort: 25 kN
  • Capacity: 25
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 66
  • Weight: 20 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years

LM 68 | From 1968 To

This vehicle, which can be used as a multiple traction system, was called an "Aquarium" because of its large side windows and skylights.

  • Cost: $634,849
  • Running costs: $105,808/year
  • Top speed: 60 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 180 kW
  • Tractive effort: 50 kN
  • Capacity: 35
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: .0x
  • Emission: 68
  • Weight: 20 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years

LVS 86 | From 1986 To

This model was developed in St. Peterburg, then known as Leningrad. It consists of two equally sized sections, each with two electric motors, which can also act as brakes.

  • Cost: $572,541
  • Running costs: $95,424/year
  • Top speed: 70 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 300 kW
  • Tractive effort: 60 kN
  • Capacity: 27
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 4.0x
  • Emission: 68
  • Weight: 35 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years

Skoda 10 T | From 2000 To

The Skoda 10 T is a low-floor streetcar manufactured by Skoda Transportation.

  • Cost: $530,130
  • Running costs: $88,355/year
  • Top speed: 70 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 360 kW
  • Tractive effort: 100 kN
  • Capacity: 25
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 5.0x
  • Emission: 67
  • Weight: 29 t
  • Lifespan: 50 years

Be 5/6 Cobra | From 2001 To

The continuous low-floor Cobra streetcar is called that because it "winds" its way through the city with its four joints.

  • Cost: $816,234
  • Running costs: $136,039/year
  • Top speed: 60 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 625 kW
  • Tractive effort: 80 kN
  • Capacity: 45
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 5.0x
  • Emission: 65
  • Weight: 39 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years

Vityaz M | From 2014 To

The trucks of this low-floor streetcar contain traction motors which are located below the floor. This allowed wider gangways.

  • Cost: $784,593
  • Running costs: $130,766/year
  • Top speed: 70 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 600 kW
  • Tractive effort: 80 kN
  • Capacity: 37
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 6.0x
  • Emission: 67
  • Weight: 37 t
  • Lifespan: 40 years

CAF Urbos 3 | From 2018 To

There are currently three series of Urbos railcars. The first Urbos 3 series went into service on 21 March 2011 for the Seville streetcar line. 

  • Cost: $911,824
  • Running costs: $151,971/year
  • Top speed: 70 km/h
  • Engine Type: Electric
  • Power: 800 kW
  • Tractive effort: 80 kN
  • Capacity: 43
  • Cargo type: Passengers
  • Loading speed: 5.0x
  • Emission: 65
  • Weight: 35 t
  • Lifespan: 35 years

W.I.P.